The road leading to the sun in Montana?

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Across the Continental Divide, one of the most awe-inspiring public works projects in the United States winds its way down the spine of the Rockies, passing by the sub-alpine meadows, lakes, and snow-capped peaks of Glacier National Park.

Across the Continental Divide, one of the most awe-inspiring public works projects in the United States winds its way down the spine of the Rockies, passing by the sub-alpine meadows, lakes, and snow-capped peaks of Glacier National Park. You should expect to spend about two hours driving the fifty miles. Due to the high risk of 100-foot snowdrifts in the winter, Going-to-the-Sun Road is only available during the summer when weather permits. Along with your road trip, consider taking a class at the Glacier Institute to learn more about the park's environment, local Native American cultures, and glacier geology.

The Pacific coast of Oregon is publicly dordle accessible because, unlike the remainder of the West Coast, it is totally controlled by the state. Travelers cruising along Highway 101 may enjoy the over 400 kilometers of beaches with pristine, unspoiled scenery. The little villages of Oregon are juxtaposed by harsh coastal cliffs and pastoral farmland and wandering cattle throughout the hour-long trip from Port Orford to Brookings. Stop at the Prehistoric Gardens if you see a Tyrannosaurus rex along the highway; the gardens have 23 life-size reproductions of dinosaurs set against a backdrop of rainforest scenery.

Highway 101 winds its way around one of the biggest wilderness regions in the continental United States, providing a gorgeous route while also serving as the only main highway on the peninsula. The Hoh Rain Forest, with its towering old Sitka spruces and western hemlocks, may be reached by driving counterclockwise from the peninsula's base. Perched 18 miles offshore from Port Angeles on Hurricane Ridge, you may get a glimpse of the San Juan Islands. Starfish, sand dollars, and crabs abound in the pools of Olympic beaches at low tide. Forks is a must-visit for Twilight lovers, so take a stop there. If you're seeking a somewhere to stay, however, go along to Lake Quinault Lodge. Without breaks, the whole circuit takes almost six hours.

 

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